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11 of the most bizarre traffic laws from around the World.

11-bizarre-road-rulesDriving is no easy feat – regardless of the country you’re in – and it’s a challenge to be across all the road rules in your state, let alone all of Australia.

However, compared to driving laws from around the globe, we have little to complain about. We’ve taken some time to look at the eleven most bizarre road rules from around the world.

Australia
Splashing a bus passenger with mud after driving through a puddle can cost you $165. Oddly enough, splashing a pedestrian with water is OK. It’s the bus and the mud that seem to be most offensive in the eyes of NSW law.

Philippines
In an effort to combat traffic congestion, the Philippines has a bizarre rule stating when cars are able to drive based on the number located on their license plates! In Manila, cars with number plates ending in a 1 or 2 must not drive on a Monday. Meanwhile, plates ending in 3 or 4 are prohibited from being on the roads on Tuesday; and of course, Wednesday is forbidden for drivers with plates ending in 5 or 6. You won’t find any cars ending in 7 or 8 driving on Thursday, while drivers with a 9 or 0 are only allowed to drive on Friday before seven in the morning!

Costa Rica
In Costa Rica, you can drink an alcoholic beverage while driving — as long as you don’t get drunk. Sipping a beer with one hand and navigating the windy and treacherous roads of Costa Rica with the other? Totally legal. Driving with a blood-alcohol level of more than 0.75 percent? You’re going to jail. Probably best to stick to water.

Denmark
In Denmark, before starting your car you are required to check lights, brakes, steering and honk your horn. Additionally, you must also do a visual check to make sure there are no sleeping children underneath the car.

Russia
If your car is dirty enough to write on with your finger, you could face a fine of 2000 Rubles (about $44 AUD). This law is enforced mainly to prevent license plates obscured by mud, but it’s up to the officers to decide.

However, they don’t make it easy for the Russian people to keep their vehicles clean – it’s also illegal to wash your car by hand on public property for ecological reasons, so you have to take it to the local car wash.

Cyprus
Cyprus is cracking down on the road rage problem with strict laws. Any aggressive hand gesture made can get you fined 25 Euros (about $35 AUD). The law states that “a driver can be fined if the person is in an irregular position inside the vehicle or raises his hand from the steering wheel unnecessarily.”

USA
Generally, road rules are enforced on the road itself, not so in the state of Oregon, USA. Here, the law states that it’s perfectly fine to drive on the footpath. As long as you move out of the way for pedestrians, of course.

Also, strictly as an FYI – it’s also illegal in Oregon to place a container filled with human faecal matter on the side of any highway.

Japan
While this rule just seems like plain common sense, in Japan it is illegal to be a passenger in a car with a drunk driver. Japan, besides risking your life, you’re also risking legal trouble — sober passengers in the car with a drunk driver can be punished under the law.

Spain
In Spain, anyone who requires prescription glasses in order to drive must keep a spare set in their car at all times. This law also applies in France.

France
In France, drivers are required to carry a breathalyser kit in their vehicle (or motorcycle) at all times. Originally, drivers who didn’t have one were required to pay a fine of 11 Euros (around $16 AUD), however, enforcement of this fine has been delayed indefinitely.

Germany
Always make sure you have enough fuel in your tank to take on the world-famous Autobahn. If you run out of fuel and have to pull over, you’re breaking the law. It’s illegal to stop unnecessarily on the Autobahn, and running out of fuel is considered unnecessary since it could have been avoided.

Even though Australian road rules tend to be a bit more straight forward, if you need help navigating the law, contact Perdriau Family Lawyers today.

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